The Hermit: Waite’s Symbols

A hermit withdraws from society for a life of religious contemplation. Whereas Waite’s predecessors interpreted the Hermit as one seeking spiritual enlightenment, Waite goes to great pains to explain that his Hermit has attained it. the Hermit is in the same class as the two other spiritual members of the first ten of the major arcana, the High Priestess and the Hierophant. In order of their presence in the deck, they were formerly said to represent inner spirtuality, external spiritual authority, and the path to spiritualty. Waite now gives them to represent the spirituality of the Christian religion, the physical presence of the Christian church, and the success or failure of the individual Christion, i.e., attainment of the wisdom of life’s spiritual journey, versus whatever lies below.

Read more

Windows Firewall: Closing the Default Pinholes

We have noted that Microsoft appears to be creating inbound firewall pinholes for some of its apps, even in installations in which a user has specifically indicate the local network is not to be trusted. This post reviews how the pinholes are implemented. It also provides illustrated examples for closing those rules, by disabling the default rules that Microsoft uses to provide exceptions for its apps.

Read more

Stength: Waite’s Symbols

For a card relatively light on symbolism, Waite goes overboard to “Christianize” the context of the Strength card, adding symbols and changing the ones previously depicted. Connecting fortitude with the mysterious aspects of the divine union required significant changes to this card. This is especially ironic given that the four cardinal virtues predate Christianity. Another change, to its very order within the tarot deck, affected the numerological interpretation of the Strength card.

Read more

The Chariot: Waite’s Symbols

We return to our series of posts regarding the symbols in the Waite Colman Smith tarot deck with the Chariot. Waite seems to be spending quite a bit of energy on distinguishing the Chariot from the High Priestess. The theme of Waite’s Chariot is mastery over this world, and most decidedly not mastery of the spriritual world. Why has he spent so much energy on this argument? My theory is that it’s a further step away from the kabbalah-leaning early interpretations of the Golden Dawn to the his Christian/Celtic re-interpretations. Exhibits “A” and “B” are the Urim and Thummim on the pauldrons (shoulder armor).

Read more

The Windows Firewall: Big Bad Wolf Coming?

We continue the discussion of the Windows Firewall changes. This is a trends backgrounder, noting that it is likely that within a few years your PC will probably have a public IP address. It will be very possible that it’s an IPv6 address provided by the same provider who currently provides an IPv6 address on your mobile phone. Having an IPv6 address is fine, as long as you have a good firewall.

Read more

The Windows Firewall: A Few Bricks Loose?

Recent trends that have loosened some of the Windows 10 inbound firewall rules. The other day I installed Windows 10 with a private IP address. During the installation, I specified that my local network was not to be trusted. What should have been a pretty restrictive set of rules… wasn’t. I’ve summarized them here as the first part of a series in which we’ll discuss how to tighten up such rules. Additionally, we’ll look ahead over the next few years, in which we can probably expect more and more people will be working with publically accessible IP addresses. We’ll then discuss remote desktop protocol access from when your away from work (or home), which we’ll try to make as safe as possible.

Read more

Book Review: Tiamat’s Wrath

Tiamat’s Wrath is undoubtedly the strongest entry in the Expanse series in several books. It returns the focus to the technology and other clues left behind by the Godlike species that sent the proto-molecule to the solar system, of their unknown killers who still linger, and of men who would re-engineer the human race. But the authors are also deft at depicting the rest of humanity, as they take baby steps into the wide reaches of the galaxy to homestead it, aided by the wormholes of the “roads” left behind by the “Roman” proto-molecule engineers. There is a renewed emphasis on minor characters, who are beneficial to the plot, and interesting, too. There is even a happy ending (sort of a “puttin’ the band back together”). Fans of the Expanse series will enjoy Tiamat immensely. For those who read the first book or two, they can jump right back in and enjoy: it has that same feeling, renewed.

Read more