The Seven of Swords – A One Page Guide

The Seven of Swords draws us in deeply. It makes us wonder what the story behind it is: is it simple theft or a military operation? It holds drama: will he be caught? Colman Smith illustrates Waite’s divinatory meanings, centered around a cunning but risky plan, taking the story of Zeus and Ganymede as her cue. That Colman Smith depicts the thief at a moment when it looks like he’s going to pull the job off adds a positive spin to the divinatory meanings of the Seven of Swords. This is like a modern heist film in which the gang of thieves are the heroes. Previously I had looked on this as a card only of sneakiness and theft. But now I look at it as something that speaks of planning and intelligence, possibly bravery; definitely high risk, high gain. It’s been fun forcing myself to look at each of the minor arcana as if I’d never really looked at it before. The Seven of Swords was a particularly fun one.

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The Nine of Swords – A One Page Guide

The underlying story of the Nine of Swords is life-and-death health issues, specifically those affecting women. Yesod and the Magician chiefly influence the “nightmare” setting of the design. Mercury/quicksilver and Air, not just as a classical element, but because it represents blood as a classical humor leads us to quickening and pregnancy. From there Waite’s words lead inexorably to Adam and Eve and what he calls her “imputed lapse.” Far from just a woman awoken from a nightmare with nine swords of Damocles above her head, the Nine of Swords represents Eve’s “lapse,” man’s ultimate rise afterwards, and those swords? They just may be there to protect her.

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